The Ultimate Managed Hosting Platform
There is very little sex education in Nigeria, at least when I was growing up. Most Nigerians learn about sex from peer groups or lecherous adults who exploit the ignorance of the young.
Ekiti, Nassarawa set to teach sex education in schools | The Guardian  Nigeria News - Nigeria and World NewsNews — The Guardian Nigeria News –  Nigeria and World News

There is very little sex education in Nigeria, at least when I was growing up. Most Nigerians learn about sex from peer groups or lecherous adults who exploit the ignorance of the young.

The main teachers of sex education in Nigeria are the prostitutes so strategically located near every boys’ boarding school or university campuses. And nannies and houseboys.

In boarding schools, one joins several societies – debating, dancing, sports, religious, etc. My school had a gramophone with some records which we used to learn how to dance. The missionaries never built a boys school that was not near a girl school. Nobody taught us how to talk to girls. We wrote love letters to girls we never knew or rather copied some love letters which some Indian had put together. There were Indian books for every conceivable activity making these our Google, Facebook, and Wikipedia of our day. The senior boys pretended that they were reincarnated Romeos. In fact, they know nothing and only used the junior boys to learn about their own sexuality or lack thereof.

There was a school dance on Saturday afternoons once a month, sometimes twice a month. The girls come to our school or we went to theirs. All the girls sat together at one end of the hall whereas the boys sat together at the other end, resplendent in their white starched and pressed trousers and school blazers. The boys would have groomed their hair with an abundance of dry clean lotion.

At the dances the longest distance anybody had ever walked was to move from where his colleagues sat and have the temerity to go and ask a girl for a dance. So Bayo walked the walk of death to the girl’s section. He had not made up his mind which girl to ask and as he walked it was clear he had no idea who to ask for the dance. He had been urging Seyi to come with him but when he and Seyi got up, Seyi had cold feet and sat back. The eyes of 30 boys and girls were beamed on Bayo as he took one faltering step after another. He would have done himself a favour if he had lazer focused on Funke who was sitting straight in front of him. By some telepathy, Funke moved and started a conversation with the girls near to her. Bayo saw the movement of Funke as an indication of refusal. So he veered

Sex Education in Nigeria: Attitude of Secondary School Adolescents and The  Role of Parents and Stakeholders - African Researchers Magazine

a little to the left, making straight for Funmi whose demeanour changed instantly to suggest that if Funke was unavailable then she could not possibly accept a dance. Bayo gets to Funke. He stretches his hands out to ask for a dance. Funke points to her chest – moi??, me?? Oh No!

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here